Jan. 17th, 2012

Shuttle / Everybody OTP

So I retweeted the following:
Which subways do you guys ship? I think A / F is fun, but 6 / 7 will ALWAYS be my OTP.

And this happened:

Jaye: I am now trying to ship train lines. Thanks

me: LOL, you're welcome! i think I ship W/7 myself.

me: unless they don't exist anymore.

Jaye: Nono, that'd be great

The 7 is pining for its lost love

me: awww. man, the h/c potential there.

Jaye: I think the shuttle would make a great rebound fuck

Yet another sentence I never thought I'd type

me: aw, man. the shuttle really gets around, though.

Jaye: maybe the transit museum sells train condoms

me: ... they probably do.

Jaye: ah, yes: http://secondavenuesagas.com/2007/01/08/condoms-a-la-nyc-subways/

me: I love this town!

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Sep. 9th, 2011

quick hits

My twitter account is full of randomness today, but at least it's moved from trauma to humor. Sort of. After discussing the inevitability of flashbacks due to a combination of 9/11 Anniversary coverage and the FIRES that are filling the sky with smoke, raining ash on homes, and making the air smell of burning (yeah, no flashback potential there AT ALL), we decided that the best solution would be for TX to send truckloads of shamwows to the flooded areas. They mop up the water, send them back, and we wring them out over the fires.
Done.
Now, we will address the deficit and jobs crisis. Ok, no we won't. We'll actually address Hollywood and it's crazy crazy remakes.

me: Russell Crowe as Javert. Hugh Jackman as Valjean. I may need to sit down.
Jaye: wow. is Hollywood making a movie just for you?
Man, they might be. They really, really might be. I'll have to take my dad! (Les Miz is one of our shared musical interests!)

And today's moment of Latin Zen: [This is full of Classics snark, and if you aren't familiar with at least I, Claudius it may make no sense.]
We were discussing historiography, Livy, and Livy's presumed friendship with Augustus. Livy produced an incredible body of work, a complete history of Rome from its founding to his present day in 142 books, writing an average of 3 books per year for forty years. The problem: only thirty-something books survived to modern day, and none of them about Livy's own time. Certain hints from later historians writing about Livy, as well as textual interpretations by modern historians, create a belief that Livy and Augustus got along very well, shared some opinions and values, and were quite possibly friends. One item that is cited as evidence is the fact that Livy was a tutor to young Claudius.
So one of the young things in my class (possibly stalling for time, I admit), asked whether there was any possibility that Livy could have known at the time of his teaching that Claudius would one day be the emperor.
I thought to myself, "NO WAY."
And then the prof said, "ABSOLUTELY NOT," making big negative arm motions.
It made me laugh.
I have to keep reminding myself, unformed larvae, unformed larvae, unformed larvae*. Some of them may be up to their ears in classical civ at that age, after all, I was, but the prof made a good point when he said that he didn't want to assume too much about the class's knowledge of the Augustan Age. (Not that I could really be considered an expert or anything, geez. It just feels like I've been pickling in random classical trivia from that general period for most of my life.)
Anyway. ZEN LATIN SNARK.
[*For all that I snark at them, they're actually quite good at Latin. Better than I am, most days!]

I walked back to my office from class and it was, alas, still really hot even with the "cool snap" we're getting. 90-something is no joke when you're walking across campus in blue jeans.

And I just took some time explaining to someone the difference between block level and in-line tags in XHTML, but I don't think I did it very well. I should work on that. Yay for validating her markup for class, though.

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Jun. 19th, 2011

Back from exhausting trip

A brief recap:
Last Sunday, at Mom's birthday dinner, we received the phone call telling us that Dad's Aunt Irma, age 94, had died. We had been told she was doing poorly, but expected some more time. So we had to fly up at the last minute. Making the flight and hotel and car reservations was exciting (whee!), but we got it done.
This is the first time in ages that the four of us (Mom, Dad, Peter and me) had traveled together as a family. We took advantage of that while we could. We had hoped to get some time in with our Connecticut family, but the surviving sister, Dad's Aunt Aida, was feeling poorly herself (at 91? 92? I wasn't clear on how old she was.) so we had a smaller window of opportunity for visiting. Still, it was a lovely chance to see her, and the cousins we had never met.
We ended up with Saturday free, and headed into Manhattan for a few hours, most of which we spent at the American Museum of Natural History with Jaye.
On Thursday, we were also able to go into Brooklyn after the family dinner had broken up, and attended the Pub Quiz at Rocky Sullivan's. Both occasions were quite fun. I'm glad we managed them.

Peter and Me with Dinosaurs
Peter and me with dinosaurs.

Dad and his Aunt Aida
Dad and his Aunt Aida

Calverton National Cemetery
Calverton National Cemetery

Click the photos to see more at my Flickr set.
Now I'm back at the ancestral homestead, and have all sorts of work to catch up on. Work for my regular job, work for ApolloCon (this weekend! Come on down!), work for my apartment, work for the family.
Good grief I'm tired.
Sleep sounds really, really good right now. Once my laundry is done, I am totally going home to get some.

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Apr. 3rd, 2011

Dorks in Manhattan: Thurs-Sat

Team Line Party at the Game of Thrones Food Truck (except Lisa who took the photo):


Read more... )

When not going out to stalk the food truck (first come, first served, 300 portions per evening of two entrees), I have been wandering around the city having fun.

Read more... )

Friday I'm in love )

Saturday full of fun )

And now we are at Sunday, and I hope to have dinner later with Seminary classmates. E and I are preparing to leave for the Brooklyn Flea. Yay!

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Apr. 1st, 2011

cold in NYC

I was going to make a big post with photos and stuff about my time on vacation so far, but I got distracted running errands in Manhattan and then catching up on LJ and email.
I had a very busy day yesterday - so much so that it feels like two days squished together. Lots of travel across three major cities, a medical emergency mid-flight (not me, and all ended well), then lots of standing around in line in the cold (which I'll be doing again shortly) for the Game of Thrones food truck (BEST. PROMO. IDEA. EVER.), then Pub Quiz in Red Hook.

I will try to make a bigger post soon, and will continue to update Flickr, Facebook, Twitter, and maybe Tumblr on the fly. (Yay magical purple smartphone.)

For now, it's time to put on extra socks and a third layer before heading down to the river for the final day of the Game of Thrones cuisine - including HEAD CHEESE, yeah!

This entry was originally posted at http://zephre.dreamwidth.org/485396.html. comment count unavailable comments posted to original post.

Aug. 17th, 2010

and then there's Facebook

Ok, so remember what I said about dealing with the fact that people will disagree with me on things, but I should post anyway?
I posted to Facebook today about the Cordoba Initiative's Park 51 building, and linked to Olbermann's Special Comment about it, which my mother emailed me this morning.
My post:
"The continuing discrimination and hate-mongering is really starting to get me down. I ask my fellow seminarians (many of whom have worked with Imam Rauf, or been taught by him, as I was) for help dealing with my own grief and anger, and then figuring out how interfaith activism can help, not just in NYC but across the country, anywhere religious freedom is threatened."

And one of my cousins (a fellow minister and a Navy chaplain assigned to a Marine unit) posted that he was also saddened by the events.
One of my Seminary classmates posted an encouraging note.
And one of my other cousins wrote this:
"Kerri, Are you for a Mosque being built close to ground zero???? Those freaks need to build it in their own country, not ours!"

Now, leaving aside the fact that she's my relative and still misspells my name (It's pretty common, really - big family, not immediate relationship. I give everybody a pass because I can't remember everybody's spelling either. We shall ignore the fact that the correct spelling is plastered all over FB), this makes it worse.

This is the culture of fear, the knee-jerk reaction against something we don't understand, the price of ignorance.  And it makes me so ANGRY.  And then it also makes me so SAD.  And I don't deal well with either of those emotions. ANGER makes me snippy and want to bang things and shout a lot. SORROW makes me curl up and cry, and that doesn't actually happen very often, that I do that snail-curl. It also makes me FRUSTRATED. Because how can I change someone's mind about this when it becomes so confrontational? How can I share the deeply spiritual and loving nature of the Muslims I know, the tolerance taught by Imam Rauf, the inclusiveness and understanding of the New Seminary, when I am so caught up in these negative emotions? That's no place from which to start teaching or talking.

I hope my responses didn't come off as completely crazed:
"As an interfaith minister, [Cousin], I am aware that Islam DOES NOT equal terrorism, anymore than Evangelical Christianity equals Terrorism or Conservative Judaism equals Terrorism. That kind of ridiculous blanket condemnation of an ENTIRE PEOPLE is a step on a slippery slope to exactly the kind of horror that the American colonists were fleeing in the first place."
and
"Also, I hate to break it to you (not), but the folks who are building and would be using this community center are American citizens. THIS is their country."

But aaaaaaargh. How can we create a community of tolerance and love? Give me some ideas, please. I feel totally powerless, and this is just the top-level news-worthy problem.  How many other places of worship and community (Mosques, but also maybe Hindu temples, or Druid groves, or Pagan spaces, or metaphysical meeting places) are being denied in other places, but won't ever make the news?
Slippery slope, indeed.

Edited to remove cousin's name, oops.
ETA: I have now calmed down somewhat, despite further infuriating posts, and folks who are interested in this issue may also be interested in this article, it's quite good: Ground Zero mosque as Wedge Issue: Muslims vs "real" Americans.

This entry was originally posted at http://zephre.dreamwidth.org/451464.html. comment count unavailable comments posted to original post.

Aug. 2nd, 2010

in which I blather more

a) Toddlers are hilarious.  Lando's biggest thrill when I visited was to have me sit in the armchair, then he would go to the other end of the room, start shrieking, and run run run run to throw himself onto my lap. I flipped him upside down, then, of course, which only made the game better.  And then he'd do it all again. And again.  And again.  ;)  Ah, to be two.

b) Lughnasadh was nice. Jon grilled and we had a tremendous harvest meal. It was a lovely day, indeed.

c) I've been seeing a lot of stories cross my feed and sometimes my flist about the proposed Cordoba House in NYC. It boggles my mind that there is so much negative press about it, in fact. And since it's crossed my flist and feed so many times, I just thought that I might give it some screen time. It's an idea that I first heard mentioned when I was in Seminary in New York, by Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf himself. Imam Feisal was our lecturer in Islam and leader in a zikr. He is a wonderful teacher and inspiring leader. It is tremendously exciting to see the Cordoba Project reaching the point of having a building, a community center, in New York. 

d) I spent a large part of Sunday sewing. Good grief, there was a lot of sewing.  It takes me a lot longer than I think it will to cut and sew strips, but I eventually shaved a few minutes off each step by not ironing the seams between every step.

e) Still enjoying Sherlock from the BBC, but The Blind Banker was not as good as A Study in Pink. I was a bit disappointed by certain character developments, but on the whole it was still entertaining. spoilers ahoy ) Despite this, I will keep tuning in. (Plus the fanfic is choice.)

f) I have a few really exciting art projects on the horizon. I am trying to figure out what project to work on for this semester's studio course. Fandom deadlines for the most part preclude using any of those projects, but one never knows.

g) I think that's it for now.  I'm sure there are plenty of other things I could blather about - in fact, I was thinking of blathering about a few in more detail, but I'm not sure if a public forum is the best way...  one of the topics is religion, the other is crafty projects. (They will doubtless at times intersect.) Does anybody want to follow that kind of blather?

Good night!

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